Writer's Quote Wednesday: Edith Wharton

The first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was an American novelist, playwright, short story writer, and designer. In addition to 15 novels, seven novellas, and eighty-five short stories, she published poetry, books on design and travel, literary and cultural criticism, and a memoir….

Monday Memories: Sydney Opera House under construction, 1970

Construction of the iconic Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia began in 1959 and was not completed until 14 years later in 1973. When I was there in 1970, residents of Sydney were complaining not only about the time it was taking to complete construction but also about the total cost. Click here for some…

Writer's Quote Wednesday: Abraham Heschel

A Polish-born American rabbi, Abraham Joshua Heschel (January 11, 1907 – December 23, 1972)  was a leading 20th century Jewish theologian and philosopher. He was a professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, was active in the civil rights movement in the U.S., and authored a number of books on Jewish philosophy that were widely…

Monday Memories: Palace of Westminster at dusk, 1978

I’m in the process of digitizing old photos and slides and thought I’d share a few from time to time. This photo of the Palace of Westminster in London was taken during our honeymoon, 42 years ago this month. (And yes, it is inverted.)

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Eleanor Roosevelt

Most people know Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) as First Lady of the United States, a political figure in her own right, a diplomat, and an activist in the areas of civil rights, women’s rights, and the rights of World War II refugees. However, few people today remember that she also…

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Virgil

One of Rome’s greatest poets, Publius Vergilius Maro, known as Virgil (15 October, 70 BCE – 21 September, 19 BCE) wrote three of the most famous poems in Latin literature: the Eclogues (or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the epic poem Aeneid. Virgil’s work has had a profound influence on Western literature, and Virgil appears as a main character in Dante’s…

Song Lyric Sunday – Trains – “Love Train”

“People all over the worldJoin handsStart a love train, love train” Written by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, Love Train was a hit single released by the O’Jays in 1972. In early 1973, it reached number one on R&B Singles and the Billboard Hot 100 and was the O’Jays only number one hit on the…

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: William Faulkner

Nobel Prize laureate William Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) is one of the most celebrated writers in American literature and in Southern literature specifically. Primarily known for his novels and short stories set in a fictional county in Mississippi, he also wrote screenplays, poetry, and essays. Some of Faulkner’s most notable works include:…

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: H.G. Wells

Best remembered for his science fiction novels, H.G. Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) was a British writer of novels, short stories, history, social commentary, biography, and autobiography. His science fiction works include The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau,  The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, and the military science fiction The War…